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Amazing Bike Trails

Gina Hillis

Gina Hillis, Broker  with Hillis Group Realty, is a well-established and highly experienced real estate professional with a strong reputation for...

Gina Hillis, Broker  with Hillis Group Realty, is a well-established and highly experienced real estate professional with a strong reputation for...

Feb 7 4 minutes read

Pedal power!


There’s a certain sense of freedom in hopping on the bike, setting off on a trail and seeing where the day takes you. With hundreds of kilometres of amazing bike trails in the area, the options are endless.



Whether you’re a dedicated enthusiast, a weekend hobbyist or a couch potato enticed into the outdoors by the great weather, the satisfaction that can come from peddling down a quiet wooded path, a scenic waterfront trail or just through the neighbourhood is hard to beat.


Close to home

The Mississauga Water Front Trail

The Mississauga sections of Waterfront Trail is a continuous trail, passing 22 parks, the Bradley Museum and Rattray Marsh, (biking not permitted in Rattray Marsh) one of the few remaining wetlands along Lake Ontario. There are plenty of cafes and restaurants along Lakeshore Rd.  Port Credit area and St. Lawrence Park are the City's most recent addition to it's waterfront, a beautiful stretch featuring historic artifacts from the area's former industrial days. For specific route details ➡️ https://walkandrollpeel.ca/trails/pdf/TPL-0045.pdf 



Both close to home and near the water, the Etobicoke West portion of the city’s Waterfront Trail follows Lakeshore Boulevard for two kilometres between Royal York and Parklawn Road. For a greater adventure, continue your biking journey across the Humber Bay Arch bridge to reach the Toronto Central bike trail and follow it all the way downtown.


Cooksville Creek Trail is an off-road multi-use trail that provides a quiet escape right in downtown Mississauga. From Shipp Drive south of Rathburn to Paisley Boulevard East, this 3.4-km route is a combination of paved and gravel trails.


Another multi-use off-road option is the Etobicoke Creek Trail. It has both natural and urban settings and can be accessed at Willowcreek Park.



Making use of a hydro corridor, the Queensway Trail is an eight-km multi-use path running parallel to Queensway through the Hydro corridor between Glengarry Road and Etobicoke Creek.


Must try trails in the city

The Toronto Central trail is part of the city’s Waterfront Trail and is a popular one. Stretching from the Humber Bay Arch bridge to Harbour Front along Queen’s Quay, there is an asphalt path specifically for bikers and a boardwalk for pedestrians. The eastern-most portion of the Waterfront Trail is the Scarborough trail, which eventually leads to The Bluffs.


The Toronto Island trail is a fabulous way to take in the city skyline. Just a short ferry ride from the mainland, the path loops around the southern side and across its middle. Tip: Unless you don’t mind jockeying for space with tourists, you might want to avoid this trail on weekends.


Another spot to visit if you want a dose of nature is High Park. One of the biggest parks in the city, it offers off-trail roads, paved walkways and a wooden boardwalk for exploring.



Back to the waterfront, but still thinking of nature, there’s Tommy Thompson Park, an urban wilderness just minutes from downtown. Located on a man-made peninsula known as the Leslie Street spit, it extends five kilometres into Lake Ontario and has become home to wildflower meadows, cottonwood forests, and wildlife, especially birds. A multi-use asphalt trail runs through the centre of the park.



If you like the historic, a family-friendly option is the Humber River/Old Mill trail starting at either South Humber or King’s Mill parks. It offers scenic views of waterways and many parks along the way for breaks.


And if all of that is not enough choice for you, you can check out the city’s map of the cycling network for many more options.


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